Kappa Sigma attempts to break the negative Greek stereotype

Ethan Morris, freshman kinesiology major, attempts to avoid being hit during a Rush Week dodgeball game.

Ethan Morris, freshman kinesiology major, attempts to avoid being hit during a Rush Week dodgeball game.

Nathan Carter

After receiving its official charter last May, the Kappa Sigma fraternity is working on making the Greek image a more positive one.

“Stigma is something we definitely have to put up with any time we talk to anybody about rushing,” said Will Lynch, president of Kappa Sigma. “People think it’s Animal House and Old School, but it’s not like that at all.”

The fraternity is trying to break this negative stereotype by hosting “good, clean, fun events” such as the dry rush. During dry rush, the brothers in the fraternity are not allowed to drink, even if they are of age.

To receive the charter, the fraternity had to recruit 50 members, raise $2,500 in one semester, plus many other objectives and red tape that they must overcome.

“Kappa Sigma’s can really feel like they’ve been part of something by getting this charter,” Lynch said. “A lot of the guys that have been here for a while in Kappa Sigma have their names on the charter so they’re going to do everything they can to protect that and see that it grows.”

Other requirements set by headquarters for Kappa Sigma to keep its newly found charter include keeping their GPAs above the average of all men on campus and participation in philanthropy events. Philanthropy events held last year included the swing-athon and the teeter-totter-athon, both of which raised money for the Children’s Haven. The fraternity plans to resurrect these events and other similar ones later this semester to recruit new members throughout the year.

“Once you get to know the fraternity men on campus you realize that they aren’t all just partiers, they aren’t all heavy drinkers; they just want to be part of something and get a little bit more out of college,” Lynch said.