Job Expo offers students diverse options

Patrol officer Diane Liedorff shows Ronnie Kingfisher, sophomore respiratory therapy major, more information about what the Tulsa Police Department has to offer.

Patrol officer Diane Liedorff shows Ronnie Kingfisher, sophomore respiratory therapy major, more information about what the Tulsa Police Department has to offer.

Cynthia Patrick

Career Services hosted its annual Spring Job Expo March 2.

Southern students were offered the opportunity to look for a part time job, full time job, summer job, internship and various programs from different graduate schools in the four-state area.

“We are targeting all students looking for those types of positions that are being offered and who are interested in going to graduate school after they graduate,” said Patricia Hurley, director of Career Services. “Many students need to realize not to look just for their major because each job has some form of interest rather it’s leadership or commutation.”

Students had varying opinions on the fair.

“I think the job expo was very helpful,” said Carrie Farris, junior management major.

“There was a huge variety for all majors.”

Others agreed.

“I thought that there were a lot of big and small business there. I also thought they had a lot of information to offer the students,” said Mindy Club, senior management major.

There were several health care, security, retail, social service, manufacture and security positions as well as graduate schools represented at job expo. There were approximately 100 organizations in attendance.

“It has been wonderful,” said Terri Edens, director of critical care at Skaggs Community Health Care. “We have had a lot of interest in our facility and expert.”

Others offering positions agreed with this sentiment.

“This is a good opportunity because we need a high interest in law enforcement,” said Dave Reindl law enforcement officer for the Overland Park police force. “We are also recruiting for full-time and part-time positions.”

Those interested in accounting were also represented at the fair.

“This is a good way to meet potential candidates for our job offerings,” said Emily Talken human resources representative for southwest Missouri bank.

Some students had to come because of a class but others were there because of their interest in their future.

“I am happy with the turnout this year,” Hurley said. “I hope students have a better aspect of jobs out there. I let students know not to see one job, but to see many jobs because if they do good, they will luck up an informal interview right on spot or be asked for an formal interview of a later date on or off campus.”